Because Owning And Flying Your Beechcraft Can Be Done Safely AND For Less Money!
  Beechcraft Flap Actuator Brackets & Flap System Components

 

Do you still think stepping on your 50 year old flap for entry and exit is a good idea?

 

 

Above is a picture from Paul S.'s N35 right flap actuator mounting showing the right mounting ear broken off.

 

Here is a picture of the actuator and cable assembly.

 

 

Here is a recent HBC Safety Communiqué #313 issued to be on the lookout for these types of flap attachment cracking issues.

 

Flap Track Repair Instructions and Tolerances HERE

 

Flap Cracking Advisory Circular HERE

 

Here is an NTSB Report on a fatal crash of a Duke, due in part to failure of the right flap mechanism.

 


 

 

Flap System Components

 

 

 

Cables

 

The supplier of the original flap cables in Bonanza/Baron and Travel Air airframes appears to be S.S. White Technologies. An original factory tag provides the evidence. FABEE11BZ1 might be a workable number to source, but at this point I'm not sure.

 

L.O.C might mean "Length of Cable" (63.31")?:

 

A SB on some of these cables was issued. Check it out HERE

 

This Mandatory Service Bulletin was issued to inspect for, and replace as necessary, any Flap Flex

Shaft Assemblies that have a manufacture date between January 2000 and April 2001, inclusive.

 

The Flap Flex Shaft Assemblies are identified on the actuator end with a paper identification label that carries the manufacture date in the form of month/year (i.e. XX/2000 or XX/00 for year 2000 and XX/2001 or XX/01 for year 2001).

 

To place a flap degree deflection decal on your flaps see the CSOBeech page HERE

 

 

 

 


 

Actuator

 

Note that the cable is held into the actuator via a snap ring.

 

 

 

 


 

Here is a diagram of the flap actuator components

 

 

 


 

Drive Motor

 

Below are a host of pictures of the typical Bonanza/Baron/Travel Air Flap motor mounting and my removal of mine for overhaul replacement after about 4800 hrs TIS.

 

Looking in under the seats at the center console area on top of the landing gear transmission

 

This is the top of the landing gear transmission looking from the pilot side toward the cabin door.

 

 

The above picture shows what can happen to the threaded portion of the brush holder cap if it gets damaged.

 

This is the brush cap with damaged safety wire hole

 

 

 

 

Looking on top of motor at right side cable attachment

 

Flap Cable seated and mounted. Note - one 11/16" nut is on outside and another 11/16" nut is on the inside. A crowsfoot wrench was all I could manage to insert in there to work the inner nut loose. Liberal doses of CorrosionX were also applied to assist in this tedious removal procedure.

 

Here the left cable has been extracted showing the inner second nut that must be removed to extract the cable. The other item that must be removed first however, are the retaining collars that secure the cables to the motor shaft by allen set screws. It has been reported that early cables with a relatively short locking key in the cable drive, utilize the retaining collars. Newer cables with a much longer "key" lock do not use the retaining collars.

 


 

Below are some custom 13/16" wrenches made by John McM. for how he dealt with the flap cable nuts. John says: " The offset wrench holds the outboard nut and the flat wrench turns the inboard nut. The cutout lets you get the wrenches over the cable. The wrenches don't exactly make the job easy but they do make it less hard."

 

 

 

Thanks for your contribution to CSOBeech John!

 


 

Tom P., reports the following pirep relating to his assisting a P35 owner R&R his flap motor:

 

1. The flap cables are not connected to the motor via retaining screws.  His cables have a keyed area on the part that fit into the geared portion of the motor.  Just no retaining screws.  

2. The crows foot required to remove the cable from the motor was 13/16, in his Bonanza, not the 11/16 your article mentioned.

3. More interestingly, we first had to back off on the nut on the outside of the flap area.  Then we were able to manually remove the keyed flap drive cable without any fuss.

 

Thanks for your contribution to CSOBeech Tom!  

 

Short "key" lock tab of early cables.

 

Retaining collar and drive motor shaft. Note the slots in both items must be aligned prior to removal and reinsertion of the cable "key". Getting this alignment correct can be quite tedious.

 

It's pretty tight in there for extracting those retaining collar set screws. Upon reinsertion of the cable the retaining collar slot must be aligned with the motor drive shaft slot to insert the cable's "key". Then the retaining collar is rotated some number of degrees (90?) to insure a last line of defense "lock" of the cable into the motor slotted drive shaft.

 

At last, the extraction can occur!

 

Insertion is the reverse - but definitely a tight space!

 

Gear Motor and brushes run to failure - NO, not mine. Contributor will remain anonymous. I believe the contributor posted the part TT as in the 6,000 hrs TIS range. Don't be this guy! After 30 or 40 years and 4,000 to 5,000 hours TIS, how much more service does the motor owe you?

 

Contact Kevin O. HERE for info on how he can help you with flap motor.

 

See Kevin's refurb process and equipment HERE .

 

 

 

 

Thinking about just slamming a new pair of brushes in that motor and keep on going? Well here's what happens when folks do that:

 

 

......plus the brushes should really be properly "run in" to seat properly.

 


 

Baron Flap Motor Circuit Parts Diagram pdf Extract (Bonanza MAY be similar) HERE

 

 

 

Baron Flap Indicator Circuit Parts Diagram pdf Extract (Bonanza MAY be similar) HERE

 

 

 


 

Flap Indicator Sensor mounted in the left wing. Very much like the wire wound resistance type fuel level sensors.

 

 

 

Click HERE for flap degree decal info.

 

 

web statistics